German Waterways
FOT-494967/418485 N Europe
11 Nights
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Shortlist
Itinerary
1
Day 1
Dover, UK, England

Epitomised by the towering, glistening white cliffs, the East Kent port town of Dover provides an ideal point of access from which to embark on a cruise. As well as its geological features, Dover also holds significant cultural and historical value. Dover Castle has stood on these cliffs for 2,000 years and its walls contain many historical relics including a Roman lighthouse, a Saxon church and a Norman keep, as well as a series of tunnels which were built for the Dunkirk evacuation.

2
Day 2
Elbe River, Rivers

The River Elbe can take you on a journey through Czech Republic and Germany, taking passengers from the Bohemian capital of Prague to the Hanseatic city of Hamburg. It flows a total distance of 724 miles, rising near the border of Czech Republic and Poland. It enters a four-mile-long gorge in eastern Germany before flowing towards Hamburg and its mouth, at the North Sea.

This stunning river will take you through many fascinating cities including: Dresden, which is regarded as the “Florence of the Elbe”; Meissen, which is renowned for its pottery; the colourful gardens and impressive palaces of Worlitz, Pillnitz, Moritzburg, and Zwinger; Wittenburg; and Magdeburg.

2
Day 2
Hamburg, Germany

Hamburg is regarded as Germany’s “Gateway to the World”, due to the fact it is home to the second largest port in Europe. This cosmopolitan city blends a modern culture with many historical structures. There are two main shopping streets, Spitaler Straße and Mönckebergstraße, which are both filled with designer outlets and specialist stores. Both of these streets will also take you to Hamburgs’ Town Hall – the Hamburg Rathaus, which was constructed between 1886 and 1897 and houses the city’s original governmental functions. A wander through the city streets will take you past intricately designed churches, the city cathedral, and the glistening harbour.

3
Day 3
Hamburg, Germany

Hamburg is regarded as Germany’s “Gateway to the World”, due to the fact it is home to the second largest port in Europe. This cosmopolitan city blends a modern culture with many historical structures. There are two main shopping streets, Spitaler Straße and Mönckebergstraße, which are both filled with designer outlets and specialist stores. Both of these streets will also take you to Hamburgs’ Town Hall – the Hamburg Rathaus, which was constructed between 1886 and 1897 and houses the city’s original governmental functions. A wander through the city streets will take you past intricately designed churches, the city cathedral, and the glistening harbour.

4
Day 4
Kiel, Germany

Kiel is the capital of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany and is located by the Baltic Sea. Soak up the scenery of this calm city and admire the German Baltic fleet, which is made up of warships and submarines. Kiel is particularly famous for the Nord-Ostsee Kanal, otherwise known as the Kiel Canal. Flowing for 99km, it is possible to walk or cycle the entire length along the canal from Kiel to Brunsbüttel.

5
Day 5
Travemunde, Germany

The German sea resort of Travemunde is a borough of Lubeck and has proven popular with families, who come in search of golden beaches and the charming harbour. The old town and light house present an element of charm, while the 1.7km white-sand beach is the main draw to the area and offers a wonderful place to relax and soak up the sun while looking out into the Baltic Sea.

6
Day 6
Warnemunde, Germany

The seaside resort of Warnemunde is a district of the German city of Rostock, in Mecklenberg. It is situated on the Baltic Sea, at the estuary of the River Warnow. Since the 19th century, it has been an important seaside resort and, today, it is overlooked by the lighthouse, which was built in 1897. Warnemunde is home to many wooden traditional-style fishermen houses and was also where the famous Norwegian painter, Edvard Munch, resided from 1907 to 1908.

7
Day 7
Kiel Canal, Germany

The 98-kilometre Kiel Canal is a freshwater canal that flows from Brunsbüttel, at the North Sea, to Kiel at the Baltic Sea. It was built in 1895, but later widened. Today, it saves an average of 250 nautical miles when compared to going around the Jutland Peninsula.

8
Day 8
Bremen, Germany

The north German city of Bremen is home to a population of over 500,000 and a number of cultural and historical relics. The 15th century Rathaus (Town Hall) has gained UNESCO World Heritage status and is one of the finest buildings of its kind in Europe. The city is also home to a number of landmarks including Dom St Petri – a 1,200-year-old cathedral with a huge façade that overlooks the main square. Elsewhere in Bremen is the Jugendstil, a street filled with a number of facades and courtyards that have been decorated in beautiful Art Nouveau designs. It is also worth noting that Beck’s Beer is brewed in Bremen and brewery tours are offered throughout the year.

9
Day 9
Bremen, Germany

The north German city of Bremen is home to a population of over 500,000 and a number of cultural and historical relics. The 15th century Rathaus (Town Hall) has gained UNESCO World Heritage status and is one of the finest buildings of its kind in Europe. The city is also home to a number of landmarks including Dom St Petri – a 1,200-year-old cathedral with a huge façade that overlooks the main square. Elsewhere in Bremen is the Jugendstil, a street filled with a number of facades and courtyards that have been decorated in beautiful Art Nouveau designs. It is also worth noting that Beck’s Beer is brewed in Bremen and brewery tours are offered throughout the year.

11
Day 11
Dover, UK, England

Epitomised by the towering, glistening white cliffs, the East Kent port town of Dover provides an ideal point of access from which to embark on a cruise. As well as its geological features, Dover also holds significant cultural and historical value. Dover Castle has stood on these cliffs for 2,000 years and its walls contain many historical relics including a Roman lighthouse, a Saxon church and a Norman keep, as well as a series of tunnels which were built for the Dunkirk evacuation.