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Exploring The Islands Surrounding The UK

With more and more cruisers looking to sail from the UK, travellers are exploring the length and breadth of the country far and wide to find new experiences that they don’t expect from ports closer to home. But, while a UK cruise might not feature the sunny shorelines that you can expect from the Mediterranean, you will get a chance to enjoy extensive history, culture and breathtaking views. So, whether you are looking for a cruise closer to home or want to learn more about the UK, seeing its famous ports and Channel Islands could be perfect for you.

Jersey

Being the larger of the two main channels islands, Jersey still uses the British Pound as its currency. The main attraction, Elizabeth Castle, is a 16th-century fortress which sits a short journey from the main island. If visiting during the summer months, guests can take advantage of Jersey’s 50-mile long coastline, with plenty of options to try windsurfing and sunbathe. Not only is it an escape from all the Brexit talks, Jersey is a destination for foodies too, thanks to Michelin-starred restaurant Samphire.

Guernsey

Only slightly smaller than neighbour Jersey, Guernsey is another tranquil getaway destination. It can also boast its own history, being home to the last remains of the German invasion during World War Two, a 7,000-square-metre underground hospital. During operation, the hospital was able to house around 500 people and you can still discover what each room was used for today. Other interesting monuments include the little chapel of St. Andrews, which has been created as a scale model of the Basilica at Lourdes and can only hold around nine people inside.

Outer Hebrides

There are 16 different islands that make up the Outer Hebrides, the two largest being Lewis and Harris. Fortunately, the islands of the Hebrides contain a lot of rich heritage and monuments including the Calanais Standing Stones, a group of large Neolithic monuments in a cruciform pattern erected in the Bronze Age. The islands are also littered with small, quaint towns that are run by tight-knit communities willing to share their heritage.

Inner Hebrides

The Inner Hebrides consist of 39 smaller islands, the most famous being the Isle of Skye, which has managed to gain popularity due to its overall beauty. There is even more to do for history buffs with many different castles dotted around the islands – Dunvegan Castle, for example, lays claim to being the longest inhabited Scottish castle. Fingal’s Cave is also another tourist hotspot, known for its unrivalled natural acoustics and unique stone columns.

If you would like to see one of the islands named on this list or one that we haven’t mentioned, call us today on 0808 163 7523 to talk to one of our experts.